0 Items

Brush up on Leadership Skills with Quick Start Training – Free Registration for the First to Respond

Aspiring chapter leaders are cordially invited to this year’s PRSA Mid-Atlantic District (MAD) “Quick Start” leadership program, taking place on Saturday, November 2, in Towson. The program – registration link here – is designed to help strengthen emerging and upcoming Chapter leaders through meaningful, practical content.  And, Quick Start enables unique networking experiences with fellow leaders from around the region.  Meet your peers, offer advice and take home some fresh, winning ideas to your Chapter.

Agenda & Featured Speaker

The day of “Quick Start” is full of only useful content, including roundtable discussions about how to turn some of the challenges we all face into opportunities.  Attendees will have the chance to share and receive thoughtful feedback on just about any PRSA-related topic, from successful programming approaches, to recruiting committee members, to leading a volunteer board. 

The event’s featured speaker is Ken Jacobs, a long-time PRSA ICON and PRSA Counselors Academy speaker who focuses on leadership and empowering team members – including those in a volunteer setting. His column on leadership appears regularly in PRSA’s Strategy & Tactics, and he has written on leadership development, executive coaching and agency management for PR News. Ken has coached and helped leaders, from C-suite executives to managers, achieve and surpass their goals.  We’re lucky to have him at the 2019 Quick Start.

Event Location & Details

The event will be held, November 2, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Sheraton Baltimore North, 903 Dulaney Valley Road, Towson, 21204

Free Registration

Each chapter receives one complimentary registration to the event (including lunch).  Registration for additional attendees is $20.  For more information, contact Mike Gross at 856-866-0411, ext. 117,  Mike@AKCGfirm.com or visit the Quick Start website.

 

Congratulations to our Chapter’s newest APRs!

Congratulations to the Maryland Chapter’s newest APRs – Christine Frey, APR, Senior Corporate Communications & Patient Education Manager at American Urological Association, and Janice Smith, Ph.D., APR, Assistant Professor in Morgan University’s Dept. of Strategic Communications.

Christine received her accreditation in June, and Janice received accreditation in August. Their accomplishments represent a year’s worth of hard work and commitment to the public relations profession!

Janice Smith, Ph.D., APR

Connect with Janice on LinkedIn

If you’d like information on obtaining your APR, contact Dianna Fornaro at dfornaro@ceiwc.com or on LinkedIn.

Finding your place in PRSA Maryland

We’re pulling together our 2020 leadership who will in turn be tapping a cadre of members in one-time, short-term and half-year roles. We’d love to help you find your place in PRSA Maryland, whether it’s a being a member of the writers pool, a quick role as an event greeter or blog writer, or role on one of our committees.

There are many reasons to opt into a volunteer role with PRSA Maryland, including

  • Acquiring new skills.
  • Honing current skills – skills-based volunteering (Experteering is the word MovingWorlds uses) offers an opportunity to build leadership skills as you apply your skills to new environment. Strong leaders can think quickly and adapt to new situations.
  • Building your network – contacts and references.

Check out Volunteering for your association has benefits for more.

And we’ll make it easy to help you learn more:

1 – Complete our simple poll

Create your own user feedback survey

2 – Ask for a call from our membership/volunteer chair, Erika Murray at info@prsamd.org.

3 – Give us a call at 443-283-8060

Meet Chapter Member Dr. David Marshall, Morgan State University

For August, we talked with the Chapter member Dr. David Marshall, Professor and Chair of Strategic Communication at Morgan State University. Dr. Marshall speaks about his love for Public Relations and his students at Morgan State.

Where did you grow up?

I’m Baltimore raised and bred. I went to public schools here. Then I went to a private high school and then to Morgan. I’m also a Morgan grad, so that makes my job much more fantastic because I feel that I am coming back to the institution that gave me so many opportunities.

In fact, almost every success I can trace in my professional career, I can tie to some professor, some influence at Morgan who has helped me along the way. So, it’s really quite refreshing to be there.

How long have you been a member of PRSA and what made you decide to join?

I have been a member since March of 2018 when I took my job as professor and chair of the Department of Strategic Communication at Morgan State. The dean wanted us to have a very close and strong relationship with our professional organizations. So, I reached out to the good people there and I got hooked up right away. Claudia Ciolfi, who was PRSA Maryland chapter president last year, was just awesome and got me connected and introduced us around. And the other part of the dean’s initiative at Morgan at our School of Global Journalism and Communication is a need to not only have academic credentials for people who are teaching students aspiring to be in public relations and strategic communications, but also substantial experience. He has indicated that he also wants them to have a very strong relationship with PRSA and particularly finds great value in the APR.

Can you talk a little bit about how journalism has impacted your PR career and what it’s done for you?

It’s amazing because I think we see this trend of people being in media and then moving to PR. I think these are the people who do really well in PR because they understand the role of the media. They can put together media releases in such a way that captures the attention of the assignment desk. Having been in the media, we all know that sometimes what gets talked about in the morning story meeting at the reporters’ table is based on the relationship the reporter has within the community. A news station has values. It has a mission statement. It has metrics. And, so I think people who’ve been on the other side of journalism who are now in PR understand they have to know the values of the media organizations. So, I’m very grateful for my experience in media because I think it helps me understand these two bodies are not at odds with each other, that they’re doing separate things.

What do you love most about the PR field in general? What drives you the most?

I think it’s the opportunity to inform and to provide information in such a way to help audiences really understand the vision, mission, values of an organization. I think the educational arm is really key in helping organizations and businesses build very strong relationships with their publics and then given the outcomes that an individual company or organization wants. Building on those relationships, they can help move people to act in a way that’s beneficial to everyone. I think that’s very fascinating.

What is one thing industry-related or not that you have learned in the last month?

I just went to a workshop sponsored by the Dow Jones News Fund at Western Kentucky University. We got our hands on a lot of technical tools to use for storytelling and how you can use that to also influence people. I learned how to fly a drone and I’m thinking about getting a license. It’s a tool that’s been used a lot in journalism, but I don’t know that we’ve used it in such a powerful way to sort of help tell organizational individual stories. And that power of using different types of visual elements to tell a story…it’s beyond what I ever thought was possible.

Credit: Western Kentucky University

What inspires you the most?

I think what really inspires me is that I am teaching students at Morgan, many of whom are coming from circumstances that are very challenging. And every day, they get out of bed and they come to school and they’re ready to engage and they see this as an investment and what’s going to happen to them that they know they have an opportunity. That is the thing that really does inspire me, especially in a media sort of frenzy that paints students and particularly students of color as being crime-engaged or not really participating fully in society. That’s the thing that really inspires me because I am seeing every day that this is not the typical young person in the city of Baltimore. They really do have hopes and dreams and aspirations that go far beyond where they are and that they’re willing to give it a try.

How would you define success?

For me, success is defined as a student who has come through our program at Morgan. And as the president is shaking their hand on one end of the stage and an employer in public relations is on the other hand saying, welcome to our firm or to our company. That is really the biggest measure of success for us at the university level because it lets us know that whatever it is that we’re doing in the classroom does have some salience or relevance to people in the industry.

Where would you like to retire?

I don’t know where I’m going to be, but I know one thing is for sure, wherever I am there’s got to be a direct route for wherever I am to BWI..

Connect with Dr. Marshall on LinkedIn.

Meet Chapter Member and Volunteer Allison Mayer, APR

For July, we talked with Maryland Chapter member Allison S. Mayer, APR, Deputy Chief of Staff, Office of the Governor. Allison tells us why she joined PRSA, what she loves the most about PR, who inspires her, and more.

How long have you been a member of PRSA and why did you join?

I joined in 2004, fresh out of college, as a member of the Charleston, SC chapter. I wanted to grow my portfolio, make friends and build leadership potential.  I served that chapter as president in 2010.

What do you enjoy most about volunteering for PRSA?

Volunteering allows me to stay engaged in the profession and mentor the next level.  For example, I volunteer on the accreditation committee for this chapter. I also judged the Agriculture Special Interest Group awards this year. While agriculture is not a field I work in, judging provided accreditation points for my APR, keeping it active. Volunteering shows engagement in the chapter and/or leadership.

What is your current position in the State of Maryland Governor’s Office?

As deputy chief of staff, I oversee a portfolio of agencies, including transportation, commerce, the secretary of state office, and a handful of others that focus on business and infrastructure.

Before taking the role this past February, I led communications at the Commerce Department. My background is in the maritime industry. My typical day involves engaging with the agencies, communicating with various secretaries to find out their priorities or challenges, and troubleshooting to advance the governor’s priorities.

What do you love most about the PR field?

It’s more than media relations; it’s problem solving and troubleshooting while trying to earn public trust for the organization. It’s challenging but rewarding. I’ve always had an outgoing personality.

How do you define success?

I try to strive for professional goals and a work/life balance. Some days are easier than others!

Who inspires you?

I’ve had several female mentors. An early one was my boss at the Port of Charleston who oversaw the public affairs of the port and moved up in a male-dominated field. She taught me how to build credibility with controversial issues. I also admire Nikki Haley.  When she was governor (South Carolina), it was inspiring to watch her on the national and international stage.

What’s one thing ­– either industry-related or not – that you learned in the last month?

I learn something new every day given the breadth of issues I’m tackling. I’ve made it a priority to go on tours to learn about different transportation projects and assets, for example, the construction of the Purple Line of the Metro and the reconstruction of Howard Street Tunnel by CSX. 

What’s something about you (a fun fact) that not many people know?

I used to be a certified Jazzercise instructor, but my certification has lapsed. It was a fun way to combine dance and activity.

What’s the last book you read?

“The Food Explorer,” by Daniel Stone. It’s the true story of a young botanist who worked for the USDA and traveled to foreign lands to introduce different foods to the U.S. We can thank him for introducing us to avocados!

Where did you grow up and where would you like to retire?

I grew up in Lexington, South Carolina, near the state capital. As for retirement, the South Carolina coast is my favorite place, but my husband talks about a ranch out West.

If you had to eat one meal every day for the rest of your life, what would it be?

Variety is too important to pick just one, but if I had to choose, it would be pasta.

Connect with Allison on LinkedIn.

imre: Employee Needs Leads Decision to Move Office

Submitted by Jill Wroblewski, Senior Program Director, Public Relations, imre

After more than 26 years in the Baltimore area, imre will move from its current office in Sparks, MD to Towson. Diving into the why move now and why Towson gives us a peak at how a PR agency lives its brand with a commitment to its staff – and how it uses research to yield decisions.

The catalyst for change came as imre needed more space to keep adding employees to its fast-growing marketing communications agency. CEO Dave Imre and President Mark Eber wanted to make sure the new locale would be convenient for 80 percent of its local workforce and would accommodate future growth. Taking staff’s needs in consideration, they utilized a heat map using employees’ ZIP codes that helped narrow the possibilities down to between Hunt Valley and Mount Washington. They then considered staff’s needs for easy access to dining and fitness among other conveniences. In the end, Towson won.

“We wanted a place with lots of light, collaborative working spaces where you could walk to great restaurants, go to the gym.  We will also be sure to utilize the kitchen space; which will be our focal point, since a lot of our employees work and gather in the kitchen,” said Eber.

Towson’s burgeoning core — with more retail and restaurants on the way — fit the bill. Imre, which has offices in New York and Los Angeles, had previously been located in Towson, but moved north to Sparks 12 years ago. The firm will be moving its 95 employees on November 1, 2019. The new offices, located at 210 West Pennsylvania Avenue, will be able to house 149 people.

The new office will include large conference spaces, a sprawling modern kitchen and an outdoor patio where employees can work in warmer weather. The goal is to create a technology-friendly space with multiple outlets to plug devices in and big TV screens.

Imre expanded in October 2018, with the acquisition of JMPR, a boutique firm in Los Angeles whose clients include Infiniti, Bugatti and Airstream.  Founded in 1993 and owned by David Imre and Mark Eber, the agency has a 26-year history of delivering meaningful results for some of the world’s leading brands through full-service creative, social, digital marketing and public relations services. Imre’s client roster includes brands such as, 3M, AstraZeneca, Dickies, John Deere, NFL, Pfizer, STIHL, T. Rowe Price and Under Armour.

 

Thank You to Our Chapter Sponsors

Thank You to Our Chapter Sponsors